pumpkin soup with shavings of parmesan

When autumn nights are drawing in, this lovely warming soup is the perfect comfort blanket.

Serves 6
Skill level: Easy
Preparation time: 1 hour

ingredients:
1 x onion, chopped
50g butter
1kg pumpkin or butternut squash, de-seeded and cut into chunks
2 x garlic cloves, chopped
2 x bay leaves
75ml white wine
900ml fresh vegetable or chicken stock
15g Parmesan rind (optional) + thin shavings of Parmesan to garnish
2 tbsp double cream (optional)
truffle oil, to serve (optional)

directions:
  1. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over a medium to low heat. Add the onion and pumpkin and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the garlic and bay leaves and cook, stirring, for a further 5 minutes.
  3. Add the wine and bring to the boil. Simmer for 2 minutes before adding the stock and Parmesan rind if using. Bring the soup back to the boil and simmer for a few minutes, then add the stock and Parmesan rind.
  4. Increase the heat, bring the soup to the boil, then simmer for 15-20 minutes or until the pumpkin is really soft. Set aside to cool slightly.
  5. When the soup has cooled slightly, remove the bay leaves and Parmesan rind.
  6. Blend the soup until smooth. Return the soup to the pan (which has been rinsed out) over a medium to low heat. If the soup is very thick, you may need to add a little more stock or water to thin it out. Reheat gently until hot.
  7. Add cream if using and season to taste.
  8. Ladle into 6 warmed soup bowls. Top each bowl with a few shavings of Parmesan. Drizzle over a little truffle oil if using and serve.

    tip:
    • Don’t throw out dried out remnants of Parmesan, as they add additional flavour to soups and stews. (After they have been stewing away for an hour or so, the rinds completely soften up and I rather like chewing on them . . . the cook has got to have some treats!)

    2 comments:

    1. Most pumpkin recipes I am seeing lately are all for sweet dishes so I am loving the savory use of this in a soup. I would love to give this a go. Thanks for sharing!

      ReplyDelete
    2. I have a theory about this . . . that Europeans are used to having pumpkin roasted, or baked or stuffed . . . Italian ravioli stuffed with pumpkin and parmesan . . . rather than going for the American sweet stuff. I like pumpkin pie but prefer my pumpkin spiced up with chillies rather than cinnamon!

      ReplyDelete

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